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People in the lab

Principal Investigator

Principal Investigator
Postdoctoral Fellows
Lab Associates
Graduate Students
Undergraduate Students
Research Assistants
Collaborators
Alumni
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Marc Joanisse, Ph.D.

Marc has been at Western since 2000, studying the cognitive and brain bases of language and reading. His research emphasizes the importance of studying multiple aspects of language ability, in a variety of populations, using a range of techniques. This includes studing phonology, reading and grammar abilities in adults and children, using everything from traditional behavioural techniques to eyetracking and neuroimaging.  
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Postdoctoral Fellows

 
 

Christina Vanden Bosch der Nederlanden, Ph.D.

Christina is a BMI postdoctoral fellow working with Jessica Grahn and Marc Joanisse to examine how children with and without dyslexia neurally entrain to speech and song. She received her Ph.D. in 2016 from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. There, her research examined how music and language are processed throughout the lifespan, with a particular focus on the acoustic characteristics that differentiate speech and song. She also examined auditory scene processing in childhood by characterizing factors involved in change deafness, the auditory analogue of change blindness.

Personal web page

     
 

Félix Desmeules-Trudel, Ph. D.

Félix is a postdoctoral fellow from the Fonds québécois de recherche – Société et culture. He obtained his PhD at the University of Ottawa in 2018, investigating sound and word processing in a first and a second language. He also conducted research on language processing in children, especially word recognition with monolinguals and bilinguals, and phonetics in a variety of languages. His current projects investigate the factors that contribute to efficient learning of foreign sounds and words in a second language, using eye tracking and electrophysiological (ERPs) measures.
Personal web page

     
 

Lab Associates

 

Jiangtian Li

Li is a third year PhD student in Philosophy investigating natural language semantics. His research is about how different senses of polysemous words are represented, processed and acquired by human beings. One of his research is targeted on how sense similarities affect processing difficulties. His work involves different methodologies ranging from distributional semantic models, formal semantics to psycholinguistic experiments.

     
 

Graduate Students

 

Alex Cross 

Alex is a fourth year student in the combined M.Cl.Sc. and Ph.D. program in Speech-Language Pathology. Her research focuses on reading ability in children and its association with structural and functional connectivity in the brain. She completed her M.Sc. in Psychology at the University of Western Ontario and her B.Sc.H. in Psychology at Queen’s University.

     
 

Joe Nidel 

Joe is a first year PhD student in psychology, studying affective differences between mono- and bilinguals. He is also interested in how differences in easy-of-reading (e.g., perceptual fluency v. disfluency) affect processing for monolinguals. He received his BA in psychology from Youngstown State University and his MSc in cognitive psychology from Western University.

     
 

Leah Brainin 

Leah is a second year M.Sc. student in psychology studying distinct memory processes involved in language learning. Her research utilizes functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) and artificial languages to examine the neural bases of language learning. Ultimately, she is interested in understanding the memory and language learning differences between children and adults. She completed her Bachelor degree in Cognitive Science and Linguistics at the University of Toronto.

     
 

Christine Moreau 

Christine is a second year MSc student in psychology, studying statistical language learning in children with various language and reading abilities. She is interested in uncovering how statistical language learning influences development in language and reading. Her work uses behavioural and neuroimaging measures to explore the neurocognitive processes of language learning. Christine received her BSc in Psychology at the University of Ottawa.

     
 

Undergraduate Students

   

Alyssa Yantsis

Alyssa is a second-year undergraduate science student at the University of Western Ontario, hoping to pursue a BSc in Medical Sciences. She is also a student of Western’s Scholar’s Electives program, which provides students with a unique educational experience to academic enrichment through interdisciplinary research-based learning. Her interests include pursuing research in language development. 

     
 

Research Assistants

Krystal Flemming

Krystal is currently working as a research assistant for Dr. Marc Joanisse.  She earned her Honours Bachelor of Science in Psychology and Linguistics from the University of Toronto and is a second year Master's student in Psychology at the University of Liverpool.  She hopes to pursue research-based work in the field of language development.

     
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Jessica Lammert

Jessica is currently working as a research assistant for Dr. Marc Joanisse. In 2018, she completed her Bachelor's degree with an Honors Specialization in Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience at Western University where she examined the structural brain correlates of reading skills in children with Dr. Joanisse. She hopes to pursue graduate school in the field of cognitive and developmental brain sciences.

     
 

Collaborators

 

Lisa Archibald, Ph.D.

Before completing her doctoral degree, Dr. Archibald worked as a clinical speech-language pathologist for 15 years providing services to children and adults with all types of communication disorders. In response to the considerable heterogeneity observed among children with developmental language disorders, Dr. Archibald has pursued a research program in the University of Durham, UK to understand childrens learning profiles and the deficits underlying them. In particular, her work has examined the relationship between linguistic performance and cognitive abilities such as working memory. Findings from Dr. Archibalds research have important implications for the assessment and remediation of developmental language disorder, as well as other communication and learning disabilities.
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Our alumni can be found here.

     

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