Graduate Course List 2014-2015

Key: Fall = Sept-Dec, Winter=Jan-April, Summer=May-August. See weights at the end of each description.

Information and Rules for Psychology Graduate Course Enrollment regarding add/drop, psych grad students taking non-psych grad courses, non-psych grad students taking psych grad courses, class size, auditing, incompletes, withdrawal dates, etc.)

This course list is sorted by Areas of Specialization and then by course number:

Department

Behavioural and Cognitive Neuroscience Clinical
Cognition and Perception Developmental Industrial/Organizational Personality and Measurement Social

Information and Rules for Psychology Graduate Course Enrollmen:
(See also the School of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies’ Graduate Calendar: grad.uwo.ca).

1) Class Size. With some exceptions, graduate courses in Psychology are typically limited to no more than 15 students. Some graduate course instructors will list class-size restrictions or eligibility or pre-requisites in their course descriptions so please be sure to read the course descriptions carefully. If there is an interest in a grad course that exceeds the normal limits, instructors may set limits or eligibility even if none are listed in the course description now.

Non-Psych grad students must contact course instructors who may wish to know the student's background before allowing enrollment. Please forward the instructor's permission message to Colleen Keech at crosskee@uwo.ca. Only Colleen or the student's graduate program assistant may officially add the course to the student's academic record, if the course is not full and the instructor permits. *Full=Please do not contact the course instructor.

(2)    Course Requirements for Psychology Graduate Degrees. Psychology students will find area course requirements on the area websites or contact your supervisor or area chair . The department course requirements for the Masters and Doctoral degrees can be found on the  Program of Study web page.

(3)    Pre-registration 2014-2015. We invite Psychology Graduate Students to indicate their interest in 2014-2015 graduate courses by adding their course choices on this web survey not later than Wednesday, June 18, 2014 .
 
While preregistration does not necessarily guarantee enrollment, we endeavour to meet the courses requirements of degrees for Psychology graduate students.

(4)    Add/Drop for Psychology Graduate Students only. Psychology Graduate Students will be able to add or drop grad courses themselves between the first week of August and the middle of September for the fall 2014 term and between the first week of December and the middle of January for the winter 2015 term. We will forward instructions in late summer.

Timing of Withdrawals. If the student withdraws within four weeks from the first day of term, no indication is made on the transcript. If the student withdraws after four weeks, but before eight weeks, the indication on the transcript will be 'WDN'. If the student withdraws after this date, the indication will be 'FAIL' ("F").

For the 2014 Fall Term: If the withdrawal occurs on or before Tuesday, September 30, 2014, no indication is made on the transcript. After Tuesday, September 30, 2014, any student who withdraws from a course will receive a grade of 'WDN.' If the withdrawal occurs after Friday, October 31, 2014, the grade will be 'Fail' for the 2014 Fall Term. Please contact Colleen to withdraw from courses after September 15th.

For the 2015 Winter Term: If the withdrawal occurs on or before Friday, January 30, 2015, no indication is made on the transcript. After Friday, January 30, 2014 any student who withdraws from a course will receive a grade of 'WDN.' If the withdrawal occurs after Friday, February 27, 2015, the grade will be 'Fail' for the 2015 Winter Term. Please contact Colleen to withdraw from courses after January 15th.

If you're interested in a grad course outside Psychology, contact the course instructor and/or the grad program assistant in that department and/or Colleen. Only Colleen or another graduate program assistant may officially add that course to your academic record.

Attn Clinical students: If at the end of the term the practica have yet to be completed, please be sure to self-enroll the course onto to your academic record in the first two weeks of the subsequent term.

(5)    Audit Form and Procedure (paper only). The student must complete the Graduate Course Audit Form obtain the instructor's and supervisor's signature and submit the form to the Psychology Graduate Office (SSC 7406) not later than the end of the first full week of classes.

6.04 AUDITING GRADUATE COURSES
The student must declare an intention to audit a graduate course by the enrolment deadline for the term, using the Graduate Course Audit Form . The student must have the instructor's signed approval to audit the course, as well as approval from the Supervisor (if applicable) and Graduate Chair. An Audit requires regular attendance and any other obligations as stated by the course instructor in the Comments/Expectations section of the Graduate Course Audit Form. If these requirements are not met, the audit will be removed from the student's record at the instructor's request.
 
After the enrolment deadline, a student may not make a change from auditing a course to taking it for credit, or vice versa, within a given term. A student may, in a subsequent term, enroll in a given course for credit that has previously been audited.

Graduate courses delivered online may not be audited without special permission from program.

Rationale for Audit Procedure. Graduate course instructors and Graduate students should take note that an official "audit" will appear on the student's transcript. The audit designation ("AUD") appears as a grade; however, SGPS will register this designation on the student's academic record at the beginning of the course using the form as noted above not at the end of the course. Because the course appears on the student's academic record and transcript, instructors often request that the student do the readings, attend class regularly and come prepared to discuss course topics. The procedure (see above) alerts the instructor to this SGPS policy.

(7) Incomplete . A student may be assigned "INC" for a maximum of one term following the end date of a course. If a student completes the course requirements at any time within the one term following the end date of a course, the 'INC' will be removed from the transcript as soon as the grade revision is submitted. The 'INC' will be replaced with a grade for the term in which the 'INC' appeared.

If the student fails to complete the course requirements in this period, the 'INC' will automatically be changed to a 'FAIL' ('F'). Except in unusual cases (medical or compassionate grounds), the School of Graduate and Postdoctora lStudies (SGPS) will decline a program's request to revise a course F grade that has evolved from a grade of 'INC.'



Department

Psychology 9021B. (Winter, 2015). Scientific Writing. J. Grahn. Half course; one term. Tuesdays, 1:00 - 4:00 pm, SSC 7405/7409. Start date: Tuesday, January 6, 2015. The Scientific Writing course will teach scientists to become more effective writers, using practical examples and exercises. Throughout the course, individuals will learn about and practice principles of good writing (e.g., cutting, improving clarity, avoiding nominalizations, and organizing sentences and paragraphs to improve understanding). In addition to grammar and style, we will cover tricks for writing faster and with less anxiety, and how to approach different writing formats (such as theses, grant proposals, manuscripts, and manuscript revisions).
Students will edit and revise their own work and that of others to practice and reinforce principles of good writing.

Psychology 9040A. (Fall, 2014). Scientific Computing. P. Gribble. The goal of this one- semester graduate seminar is to provide you with skills in scientific computing - tools and techniques that you can use in your own research. We will focus on learning to think about experiments and data in a computational framework, and we will learn to implement specific algorithms using a high-level programming language (mainly Python although we will see some
 
C and R code as well; Matlab is also a possibility if you want to substitute on your own.) Learning how to program will significantly enhance your ability to conduct scientific research today and in the future. Programming skills will provide you with the ability to go beyond what is available in pre-packaged analysis tools, and code your own custom data processing, analysis and visualization pipelines. Half course (0.5); one term. Mondays and Wednesdays, 2:30 - 4:00 pm, Stevenson Hall 3166. Start date: Monday, September 8, 2014.

Psychology 9041B. (Winter, 2015). Introduction to Statistics Using R. P. Gribble. The goal of this one-semester graduate seminar is to provide you with a deep understanding of the logic behind statistical analyses of data, to learn a set of standard statistical techniques, and to gain hands-on experience using the R language for statistical computing and graphical display of data. We will cover an initial set of core topics including sampling distributions, t-tests, ANOVA (and its variants), multiple comparisons & post-hoc tests, and multiple regression. We also cover a set of advanced topics pertinent to modern research in psychology and neuroscience such as maximum-likelihood estimation and bayesian approaches to data analysis and modelling.
Mondays and Wednesdays, 2:30 - 4:00 pm, Stevenson Hall 3166. Start date: Monday, January 12, 2015.

Psychology 9343A. (Fall, 2014). Mathematical Modeling of Group and
Individual Differences. R. W. J. Neufeld. Emphasis is on analytic modeling, where predictions emanate from mathematical derivations. Models are structured around specific psychological content, and substantive issues, such as information processing, cognitive-workload capacity, decision and choice, memory processes, concept-learning, and perceptual organization.
Advantages of formal modeling include the provision of measurement methods surmounting issues encountered with multi-item inventories, and model-prescribed empirical self-diagnostics. Utility in individual-difference psychology is the focus. Although many examples are taken from clinical psychology, procedures are general, and presentation is tailored to students' specific quantitative backgrounds . Considered are methods of model development and evaluation; "mixture-model" provision for individual differences in model expression; Bayesian customization of group level findings to individual participants; cognitive- and statistical-science disciplined monitoring of changes in individual cognitive functioning, and in evaluating efficacy of cognition-directed treatment programs; extensions of analytical, process modeling to connectionist modeling; and implications of analytical modeling for neuro-imaging (e.g., fMRI) studies, including specification of intra-trial times of measurement interest, complementing brain regions of interest, along with preferred methods of imaging-data analysis. Chaos-theoretic and game-theoretic topics are considered depending on student interest. Students present seminars on topics in their research domains. Resources include 2 special-section tutorials of Psychological Assessment, an APA Publications volume ( which also serves as the text ; each edited by the instructor), supplemented by a special issue of the Journal of Mathematical Psychology (co- edited by the course instructor), along with the forthcoming Oxford Handbook of Mathematical and Computational Psychology. Relevant software resources are addressed. The course is open to all students. Pre-requisite: Psychology 9540, or equivalent. Half course (0.5); one term.
Thursdays, 9:00 am to 12:00 pm, WH 20E. Start date: Thursday, September 11, 2014.

Psychology 9540 (Fall, 2014 & Winter, 2015). Research Design. R. C. Gardner. This course serves as a general survey of statistics at the graduate level, stressing conceptual understanding,
 
awareness of the mathematical basis, and application and use of most major analytic procedures. Topics covered include the logic of inferential statistics, bivariate regression/ correlation, univariate analysis of variance (both traditional and regression approaches), multiple regression/correlation, logistic regression, factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, path analysis/causal modeling, multivariate analysis of variance and discriminant function analysis. Most applications of the procedures focus on SPSS.  Full course (1.0); two terms. Wednesdays, 9:00 am to 12:00 noon, SSC 7409/7405. Start date: Wednesday, September 10, 2014.

Developmental

No Developmental Graduate Course offerings for 2014-2015.

Personality and Measurement

Psychology 9545A. (Fall, 2014). Test Construction and Survey Design. D. Saklofske. This course is intended for psychology graduate students who need to develop test instruments such as questionnaires, short performance scales, observation schedules, interview checklists etc. for their current research or practice. Students should know in advance what variables/factors they are intending to measure (e.g., resiliency, motivation, well-being) and be familiar with the relevant research and assessment issues . Students should also have completed at least a foundational course in psychometrics as well as intermediate statistics and be familiar with statistical packages such as SPSS. It is expected that students will complete the basic scale development and have sufficient data to demostrate the psychometric integrity and usefulness of the measure. While each project will stand alone, common themes such as item writing, reliability and validity, and norming will be discussed in the larger group, creating a richer and collaborative/supportive learning opportunity. Students interested in applying to this course require the approval of the instructor and should meet with him/her to determine the 'goodness of fit'. Half course (0.5); one term. Tuesdays, 9:00 am to 12:00 noon in SSC 8409. Start date: Tuesday, September 9, 2014.

Psychology 9555A. (Fall, 2014). Structural Equation Modeling. P. Tremblay. This course serves as an introduction to structural equation modeling (SEM), a very flexible technique for modeling relationships among variables. The course assumes no prior experience with SEM, and it is intended as both a theoretical and practical introduction. However, students will benefit from previous knowledge of multiple linear regression, factor analysis, and psychometric principles of reliability and construct validity. Software packages demonstrated in the course will include Mplus and AMOS. Course topics will include confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), traditional path analysis, and basic principles of model building including specification, identification, estimation, hypothesis testing, and modification. The overall objective of this course is to provide students with the necessary knowledge to apply SEM to research in scale construction and evaluation, construct validation, theoretical development and special designs involving mediation and moderation, multi-group analyses, and latent growth modeling. The course textbook is Kline, R. B. (2011). Principles and Practice of Structural Equation Modeling. Third Edition . New York : Guilford Press. Prerequisite: must have taken Psychology 9540 (Research Design) or obtained the permission of the instructor. Class size is limited to 15 students and there will be no audits. If accepted into the course, Val will add the course to your academic record.
 
Half course (0.5); one term. Wednesdays, 9:00 am to 12:00 noon, SSC 8438/8440. Start date: Wednesday, September 10, 2014.

Psychology 9542B. (Winter, 2015). Multilevel Modeling (MLM). P. Tremblay. This course serves as an introduction to multilevel modeling (also known as hierarchical linear modeling, mixed models). The course is designed as a continuation of the Psychology 9555 Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) focusing on Mplus as the main analytical software and including research and analytical methods that merge MLM with SEM. Students should therefore have a solid understanding of multiple regression and structural equation modeling and would benefit from previous knowledge of analysis of variance. Course topics include a review of traditional regression procedures, research design with multilevel structures, the basic two-level regression model (and extension to three-levels), methodological and statistical issues including power analyses, models with longitudinal data, models with dichotomous, categorical or count outcomes and structural equation models with multiple data levels. The objective of this course is to provide students with the necessary knowledge to apply MLM to research; the course will therefore involve hands-on projects in which students have the opportunity to analyze their own data or to conduct simulation studies (in Mplus or other packages such as HLM or SPSS Mixed Models). Prerequisite: must have taken Psychology 9540 (Research Design) and should have taken Psychology 9555 (SEM) or obtained the permission of the instructor. Class size is limited to 15 students and there will be no audits. The course textbook is Hox J. J. (2010). Multilevel analysis. Techniques and application . 2nd edition . New York: Routledge.

Topics: 1. Introduction, Overview, Rationale; 2. Building blocks: Multiple regression and ANOVA; 3. Multilevel Data and Research Design; 4. The Basic Two-Level Regression Model;
5. Methodological and Statistical Issues; 6. Sample size, power, Monte Carlo; 7. Analyzing Longitudinal Data; 8. Dichotomous, Categorical, Count Data; 9. MLM meets SEM: Factor models; 10. MLM meets SEM: Path models. Wednesdays, 9:00 am to 12:00 noon, SSC 8438/8440. Start date: Wednesday, January 7, 2015.

Cognition and Perception

Psychology 9111A. Concepts and Categories. J. P. Minda. The ability to learn and use categories is a characteristic of intelligent behaviour. Categories allow a person to generalize information to new situations or to previously unseen objects. Categories also allow for many variations of an item to be treated as the same thing. In this course, we will review theoretical accounts categorization. We will also review current models of classification and categorical decision making. In addition, we will spend some time getting into the mechanics of several computational models and we will use these models to create simulations of category learning scenarios. Tuesdays, 9:30 am to 12:30 pm, SSC 7405/09. Start date: Tuesday, September 9, 2014.

Social

Psychology 9701A. Theories in Social Psychology. L. Campbell. The general purpose of the course is to provide an overview of different theoretical approaches in social psychology and the ability to critically evaluate the range and the limits of social psychological theories from a meta-
 
theoretical perspective. The class will address (a) meta-theoretical principles in the evaluation of scientific theories, (b) classic and contemporary approaches to understanding social psychological phenomena, and (c) current controversies in social psychology. Maximum enrollment: 12 students (priority will be given to social psychology students at the Master's level). Half course (0.5); one term. Mondays, 10:00 am to 1:00 pm, SSC 8409. Start date: Monday, September 8, 2014.

Psychology 9723A Psychological Perpsectives on Immigration. V. Esses. This seminar will survey theory and research in psychology and related disciplines that aids in understanding the processes associated with immigrants and immigration. Among the topics to be covered are determinants of attitudes toward immigrants and immigration policies, the role of the media, acculturation attitudes, and the importance of ethnic and national identity. This will be a seminar course in which we discuss the major conceptual and theoretical issues within each topic area and evaluate the available empirical work. Half course (0.5); one term. Tuesdays, 9:30 am to 12:30 pm, SSC 5220. Start date: Tuesday, September 9, 2014.

Industrial/Organizational

Psychology 9611A. (Fall, 2014). Performance Appraisal and Related Issues. R. Goffin. As a topic within the area of industrial/organizational psychology, this course will cover research relevant to the application of psychological theory and methods for the purpose of appropriately measuring a key criterion variable within work-settings, that is, job performance. A variety of approaches to the measurement of performance will be discussed in detail and some of the more prominent topics will be validation and evaluation of the "goodness" of performance appraisals, attempts to improve performance appraisals, and theories of job performance. Note: You must obtain permission from the instructor to take this course if you are not in the Industrial/Organizational program. Half course; one term. Thursdays, 1:30 - 4:30 pm, SSC 8409. Start date: Thursday, September 11, 2014.

Psychology 9622B. (Winter, 2015). Motivation and Leadership. J. Meyer. This seminar course is designed to familiarize students with theory and research on motivation and leadership in a work context. We will discuss classic and modern theories of motivation and leadership and critically evaluate the research that has been conducted to test them. Implications for the design of motivation systems and for the assessment and selection of managers will also be addressed. Preference for enrollment will be given to students in the Industrial/Organizational program.
Half course; one term. Tuesdays, 1:30 - 4:30 pm, SSC 8409. Start date: Tuesday, January 6, 2015.

Psychology 9643A. (Fall, 2014). Doctoral Seminar in I/O Psychology. N. Allen. Half course; one term. Wednesdays, 1:30 - 4:30 pm, SSC 8409. Start date: Wednesday, September 10, 2014.

Clinical

Psychology 9300A. (Fall, 2014). Professional Foundations of Clinical Psychology. I. Nicholson. The course serves as an orientation to professional issues relevant to all areas of
 
clinical psychology. Ethics, standards of practice, legislation, and other professional issues will be considered. This course is restricted to Clinical Students. Half course (0.5); one term.
Mondays, 5:00 - 8:00 pm, Room 1 (357 Windermere Road). Start date: Monday,
September 8, 2014.

Psychology 9301B. (Winter, 2015). Clinical Skills Pre-practicum. This course is designed to provide clinical psychology students with an initial orientation to fundamental issues and skills that underlie assessment, intervention, and evaluation. Substantial practice in basic interviewing techniques, using a programmed micro-skills approach, will be one of the major components of this course. Students may also receive some preliminary practice using several standard cognitive-behavioral techniques. Examples of other topics that may be covered include therapist issues, the therapeutic relationship, client issues, assessment, and goal-setting procedures. The course will focus on helping each student developing a framework for understanding practical concerns and issues relating to clinical work. Pre-requisites: Successful completion of Psychology 9300 and current enrolment in the clinical psychology graduate program. Half course (0.5); one term. Thursdays from 5-8 p.m. SDC 4100 (Western Student Services Building)

Psychology 9311A. (Fall, 2014). Adult Psychopathology and Diagnosis. P. Hoaken. The purpose of this course is to examine the scientific and clinical literatures relevant to normal and pathological behavior in adults. Early sessions will focus on nosological systems for categorizing psychopathology, with particular attention to the DSM-IV-TR. Seminars will then focus on each of the major categories of psychological disorders occurring in adults. Issues relevant to etiology, differential diagnosis, and treatment planning will also be considered. This course is restricted to students in the clinical program. Half course (0.5); one term. Mondays, 1:00 - 4:00 pm, WH 36E. Start date: Monday, September 8, 2014.

Psychology 9321B. (Winter, 2015). Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy. D. Dozois. Cognitive- behavioural therapies figure prominently among the empirically supported treatments currently recognized in psychotherapy. These approaches have demonstrated significant growth and have been applied successfully to an array of clinical disorders. The main objectives of this course are to (1) provide students with an overview of the history, theory, research, and practice of various cognitive-behavioural therapies; (2) foster motivation in students to be informed by the empirical literature; and, (3) promote the development of clinicians who critically evaluate and utilize research to guide their approaches to treatment. Through discussion, lectures, and presentations, students will become familiar with the theoretical rationale underlying different cognitive therapeutic approaches, the empirical data supporting various techniques, and the psychotherapy outcome literature regarding the efficacy of cognitive therapy for different disorders. With
hands-on demonstrations, exercises, role-playing activities, and videos, students will learn session-by-session techniques and strategies for treating various disorders and difficulties. The treatment of major depressive disorder, panic disorder, social phobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, specific phobia, posttraumatic stress disorder, couple distress, and borderline personality disorder will be emphasized. Toward the end of the term, we will also focus on special issues in cognitive-behavioural therapy such as dealing with unmotivated clients, managing suicidal clients, preparing for treatment termination, and preventing relapse. Enrolment is restricted to clinical psychology students. This course is most
 
beneficial for students who have at least some therapy experience. Thus, because enrolment is limited to eight (8), preference will be given to senior clinical students. Half course (0.5); one term. Tuesdays, 9:00 am to 12:00 pm, WH 36E. Start date: Tuesday, January 6, 2015.

Psychology 9322A. (Fall, 2014). Intervention with Children. G. Reid. This course offers an overview of interventions for psychosocial problems in children. The focus will be on individual therapeutic interventions with children with a systems perspective. Exposure to parent and family interventions will be provided along with an understanding of environmental systems that impact on interventions with children (e.g., schools, physicians, mental health system). Major types of interventions, and treatments for most common disorders of children will be covered.
Knowledge of developmental factors in intervention and empirical support for interventions will be highlighted throughout. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: Psychology 621a/9310: Child Psychopathology. Also, course enrolment is strictly limited to no more than 10 students and preference will be given to senior clinical students. If the pre-registration figure exceeds 10, the instructor will make the final decision about the students in the class. The instructor will notify students by late June about who will be allowed to enroll. Half course (0.5); one term. Tuesdays, 9:00 am to 12:00 noon, WH 20E. Start date: Tuesday, September 9, 2014.

Psychology 9343A. (Fall, 2014). Mathematical Modeling of Group and
Individual Differences. R. W. J. Neufeld. Emphasis is on analytic modeling, where predictions emanate from mathematical derivations. Models are structured around specific psychological content, and substantive issues, such as information processing, cognitive-workload capacity, decision and choice, memory processes, concept-learning, and perceptual organization.
Advantages of formal modeling include the provision of measurement methods surmounting issues encountered with multi-item inventories, and model-prescribed empirical self-diagnostics. Utility in individual-difference psychology is the focus. Although many examples are taken from clinical psychology, procedures are general, and presentation is tailored to students' specific quantitative backgrounds . Considered are methods of model development and evaluation; "mixture-model" provision for individual differences in model expression; Bayesian customization of group level findings to individual participants; cognitive- and statistical-science disciplined monitoring of changes in individual cognitive functioning, and in evaluating efficacy of cognition-directed treatment programs; extensions of analytical, process modeling to connectionist modeling; and implications of analytical modeling for neuro-imaging (e.g., fMRI) studies, including specification of intra-trial times of measurement interest, complementing brain regions of interest, along with preferred methods of imaging-data analysis. Chaos-theoretic and game-theoretic topics are considered depending on student interest. Students present seminars on topics in their research domains. Resources include 2 special-section tutorials of Psychological Assessment, an APA Publications volume ( which also serves as the text ; each edited by the instructor), supplemented by a special issue of the Journal of Mathematical Psychology (co- edited by the course instructor), along with the forthcoming Oxford Handbook of Mathematical and Computational Psychology. Relevant software resources are addressed. The course is open to all students. Pre-requisite: Psychology 9540, or equivalent. Half course (0.5); one term.
Thursdays, 9:00 am to 12:00 pm, WH 20E. Start date: Thursday, September 11, 2014.

Psychology 9380Y. Clinical Psychology Proseminar 2014-2015. D. Dozois. This proseminar course consists of a series of workshops, brownbags and two clinical program meetings (1 in the
 
fall and 1 in the spring). Typically, there are two workshops and six brownbags per year. Presentations focus on various clinically relevant topics, and are made by adjunct clinical faculty, core faculty, or other guest speakers. Workshops are typically a half-day or day-long, with each providing in-depth coverage of a specific topic of interest to clinical students. The proseminar series is a requirement of the clinical program, with all students (except those completed or on internship) expected to attend all of the events that are part of the proseminar series. This course is limited to clinical students. Zero weighted course; three terms.

Clinical Practica

Psychology 9800. (Fall, 2014 and Winter, 2015).Clinical Assessment Practicum. I. Nicholson and R. W. J. Neufeld. This course is designed to provide clinical students with basic skills in the administration, scoring, interpretation, and integration of several major psychological assessment instruments currently used in clinical practice with adults and children. Supervised practical experience assessing adults and children in clinical settings is included.
Emphasis is also placed on the integration of assessment data, case conceptualization, and report writing. There will also be discussions of current issues in clinical assessment, ranging from basic issues of psychometrics, to contemporary quantitative developments in assessment technology. Prerequisites: Limited to clinical students who have already taken Psychology 9300, 9301. A course in psychopathology, either Psychology 9310 or 9311 are required as either prerequisites or corequisites. Full course (1.0); two terms. Fridays, 2:00 pm to 5:00 pm, WH 20E. Start date: Friday, September 12, 2014.

Psychology 9801U, 9802U or 9803U. Initial Intervention Practicum at Western's Student Development Center. This  course will entail a placement at Western's Student Development Center, typically in the Summer of the MScI year. Designed to help student ease into their roles as clinicians, there will  be ample opportunities to observe, be observed by and/or conduct co- therapy sessions with a senior clinician. This senior clinician will either be an SDC Staff Psychologist or a London Clinical Psychology Consortium Resident. The amount of time committed to this placement is to be agreed upon by the student, his/her research supervisor and the SDC placement coordinator. Enrolment is restricted to students in Western's Clinical Psychology Program.  Quarter course; one term.

Psychology 9805Y, 9806Y, 9807Y, 9808Y, 9809Y, 9810Y, 9811Y, 9812Y, 9813Y or 9814Y.
Clinical Practicum. L. Swartzman. This clinical practicum involves placement of clinical students with an adjunct clinical faculty supervisor in one of our clinical settings (adult or child). Prerequisites: For clinical students who have completed Psychology 9300, 9301, 9800, and 9310 or 9311. Clinical students will complete 9805Y before using 9806Y for the next practicum placement, complete 9806Y before using 9807Y for the subsequent practicum placement and so on. Half-course (0.5 or 180 hours)=9805Y to 9819Y; two or more terms. Quarter-course (0.25 or 90 hours)=9820U to 9839U; two or more terms. Thursdays, 1:30 - 4:30 pm (Sept. through April), WH 36E.

Psychology 9850, 9851, 9852, 9853 or 9854. Applied Research Practicum. L. Swartzman. This applied research practicum involves placement of clinical students in any one of a range of local service delivery settings (including physical and mental health delivery settings,
 
community agencies, etc.) where they undertake and/or serve as consultants for on-site research projects. "Research" in this context is broadly defined. Students work under the supervision of the course instructor and, when appropriate, may also be co-supervised by an on-site psychologist or other researcher. Those interested in taking this course are encouraged to speak with the course instructor as soon as possible, so that their particular interests, abilities and time constraints can be matched with the research needs of the service setting. NOTE: Enrolment in this course is limited to PhD clinical students. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor, and, preferably, successful completion of a graduate level applied research course or its equivalent (e.g., Clinical Research Methods (9340), Program Development, Evaluation, and Marketing (9341); Psychotherapy Research (9342); Quantitative Clinical Cognitive Science and Assessment (9343)). Clinical students will complete 9850 before using 9851 for the next practicum placement, complete 9851 before using 9852 for the subsequent practicum placement and so on. Half-course (0.5 or 180 hours)=9850 to 9854; two or more terms. Quarter-course (0.25 or 90 hours)=9855U to 9859U; two or more terms.

Psychology 9860Y, 9861Y, 9862Y, 9863Y, 9864Y, 9865Y, 9866Y, 9867Y, 9868Y, or 9869Y.
Clinical Supervision Praciticum. L. Swartzman. Clinical students will complete 9860 before using 9861 for the next practicum placement, complete 9861 before using 9862 for the subsequent practicum placement and so on. Half-course (0.5 or 180 hours) = 9860Y to 9865Y; two or more terms. Quarter-course (0.25 or 90 hours) = 9870U to 9879U; two or more terms.
Thursdays, 1:30 - 4:30 pm (Sept. through April), WH 36E.

Psychology 9880U, 9881U or 9882U. Clinical Practicum in Community Mental Health. L. Swartzman. This practicum  affords clinical graduate students, typically during their MSc I and/or II year, the opportunity to provide basic supportive counselling to adults presenting with a range of personal concerns, in a transdisciplinary community setting. Students will be supervised by clinical psychology residents or senior clinical psychology students as well as by registered psychologists.  This one semester course will be offered in each of the Fall, Winter and possibly Summer terms. Students' time commitment is 5 hours per day/evening per week for 12 weeks, plus 10 hours of orientation/initial training.  Enrolment is restricted to students in Western's Clinical Psychology Program.  Quarter course; one term Thursdays, 1:30 - 4:30 pm (Sept. through April), WH 36E.

Psychology 9890. Clinical Internship. D. Dozois . This course is a full-year (2000-hour) internship for clinical students who have completed all course and practicum requirements, and have made substantial progress on their dissertation. Typically, students are expected to submit a first draft of their dissertation prior to leaving on internship. The internship must be carried out at an approved setting, and written permission is required from both the supervisor and the Director of the Clinical Psychology Program.

Behavioural and Cognitive Neuroscience

Psychology 9207Y. (Fall 2014 & Winter 2015). Research Seminar in Behavioural and Cognitive Neuroscience. S. Kohler. Faculty and students in Behavioural and Cognitive Neuroscience and related areas meet every week for one hour to report on ongoing research.
 
Some didactic topics are also covered. Half course (0.5); two terms. Wednesdays, 12:30 to 1:30 pm. SSC 2028.

Psychology 9223A. Neuroimaging of Cognition. J. Culham. Brain imaging, particularly functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), has become a common tool to study specialized human brain regions involved in cognitive functions. Lectures and demonstrations will cover brain imaging technology, data quality and preprocessing, experimental design and analysis (including multivariate analyses and brain connectivity approaches), and discussion of the merits and limitations of neuroimaging as a tool for cognitive neuroscientists. The course will emphasize the development of skills that are important for a career in academia: grant-writing, oral presentations, and critical thinking. By the end of the class, students should be able to read, understand, and critique papers in brain imaging.The course is intended for graduate students in Psychology, Neuroscience and related disciplines but is also open to upper-level undergraduates with the instructor's permission. There are no prerequisites and no prior neuroimaging experience is required, although some advanced material will be discussed for the benefit of more senior students with prior fMRI experience. Half course (0.5); one term. Mondays, 9:30 am to 11:30 am BGSB 0165(class) and Mondays, 11:30 am to 12:30 pm SSC 1000 (lab). Start date: Monday, September 8, 2014.

Psychololgy 9229B. Developing Animal Models in Behavioral Neuroscience. K.-P. Ossenkopp. The utility of animal models to some degree reflects the similarity of genes and brain substrates among humans and infrahuman primates and rodents. In behavioral neuroscience (BN) animal models allow for the examination of brain-behavior relationships that may be of relevance to human behavior and behavior pathology. Indeed there is a strong tradition in BN in the development of a large variety of animal models. This course will examine the scientific basis for creation of animal models and deal with the various types of validity that apply to these models. In addition we will examine the role of endophenotypes in model development and how to apply appropriate behavioral neuroscience methodology to the quantification of such endophenotypes. The course will also examine some popular animal models for such pathologies as depression and anxiety disorder, hyperactivity disorders, as well as schizophrenia, obsessive/compulsive disorders, and autism spectrum disorder, among others. Performance assessment in the course will be based on in class discussion, an essay, and a project related to development of BN methods for quantifying new endophenotypes. Half course; one term Tuesdays, 1:00 - 4:00 pm, SSC 8409. Start date: Tuesday, January 6, 2015.